Monday, April 30, 2018

Poe 1930, Pt. 1

(Continued from Poe 1910, Pt. 4) 

THE RAVEN   (1930)

Continuing my look at early "Illustrated" books with yet another version of Poe's most famous poem...

"THE RAVEN"

Ferdinand Huszti Horvath was a Hungarian immigrant and book illustrator, who was born in 1891 and died of a stroke in 1973. From 1934-1937, he worked at the Disney Studios on everything from advertising to illustrations for a pop-up book to painting backgrounds and doing layouts to constructing three dimensional models (such as making a windmill for study for "The Old Mill") to character designs and gags for over fifty Silly Symphonies and Mickey Mouse shorts.

But BEFORE all that... he did this visually stunning version of Poe's poem.

I first became aware of this via one of my numerous online searches.  It was only much later, as I was preparing to set up these early pages from 1881-up that I realized I should look into putting this one up along with the Gustave Dore and other versions.  But then I ran into a glitch.  Checking the Grand Comics Database site, the story was NOT listed in the book I believed it to be in.  Instead, they listed in a different book in the same horror anthology series.
I ordered that book... only to find when it arrived that EVERY single story listed at the GCD was not in that volume!

I then did another search, and found at the "Comic Book DB" (a different online database), it WAS listed in the book I originally had it listed under.  Returning the first book, I then ordered this other one.  A week later, SUCCESS!  Good thing.  The only original copy of Horvath's "RAVEN" I could find online was selling for upwards of $300.00-- way outside my budget.

While I often remove yellowing from pages when I do clean-ups, for the 2nd time here, I decided to go the other way, and ADD color tinting to ALL the scans, giving it a "silent movie" look very much in keeping with the work of someone who did so much in Hollywood.

Also, as I did with the Gustave Dore version, I decided to discard the all-text pages, and substitute simple TYPE between the artwork, where appropriate.

ENJOY!

THE RAVEN
cover by FERDINAND HUSZTI HORVATH
     (Dodd, Mead & Company  /  New York  /  1930)
"THE RAVEN"  /  Version 6
Art by FERDINAND HUSZTI HORVATH

Once upon a midnight dreary, while I pondered, weak and weary,
Over many a quaint and curious volume of forgotten lore—
    While I nodded, nearly napping, suddenly there came a tapping,
As of some one gently rapping, rapping at my chamber door.
“’Tis some visitor,” I muttered, “tapping at my chamber door—
            Only this and nothing more.”
    Ah, distinctly I remember it was in the bleak December;
And each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor.
    Eagerly I wished the morrow;—vainly I had sought to borrow
    From my books surcease of sorrow—sorrow for the lost Lenore—
For the rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
            Nameless here for evermore.
    And the silken, sad, uncertain rustling of each purple curtain
Thrilled me—filled me with fantastic terrors never felt before;
    So that now, to still the beating of my heart, I stood repeating
    “’Tis some visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door—
Some late visitor entreating entrance at my chamber door;—
            This it is and nothing more.”
    Presently my soul grew stronger; hesitating then no longer,
“Sir,” said I, “or Madam, truly your forgiveness I implore;
    But the fact is I was napping, and so gently you came rapping,
    And so faintly you came tapping, tapping at my chamber door,
That I scarce was sure I heard you”—here I opened wide the door;—
            Darkness there and nothing more.
    Deep into that darkness peering, long I stood there wondering, fearing,
Doubting, dreaming dreams no mortal ever dared to dream before;
    But the silence was unbroken, and the stillness gave no token,
    And the only word there spoken was the whispered word, “Lenore?”
This I whispered, and an echo murmured back the word, “Lenore!”—
            Merely this and nothing more.
    Back into the chamber turning, all my soul within me burning,
Soon again I heard a tapping somewhat louder than before.
    “Surely,” said I, “surely that is something at my window lattice;
      Let me see, then, what thereat is, and this mystery explore—
Let my heart be still a moment and this mystery explore;—
            ’Tis the wind and nothing more!”
    Open here I flung the shutter, when, with many a flirt and flutter,
In there stepped a stately Raven of the saintly days of yore;
    Not the least obeisance made he; not a minute stopped or stayed he;
    But, with mien of lord or lady, perched above my chamber door—
Perched upon a bust of Pallas just above my chamber door—
            Perched, and sat, and nothing more.
Then this ebony bird beguiling my sad fancy into smiling,
By the grave and stern decorum of the countenance it wore,
“Though thy crest be shorn and shaven, thou,” I said, “art sure no craven,
Ghastly grim and ancient Raven wandering from the Nightly shore—
Tell me what thy lordly name is on the Night’s Plutonian shore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    Much I marvelled this ungainly fowl to hear discourse so plainly,
Though its answer little meaning—little relevancy bore;
    For we cannot help agreeing that no living human being
    Ever yet was blessed with seeing bird above his chamber door—
Bird or beast upon the sculptured bust above his chamber door,
            With such name as “Nevermore.”
    But the Raven, sitting lonely on the placid bust, spoke only
That one word, as if his soul in that one word he did outpour.
    Nothing farther then he uttered—not a feather then he fluttered—
    Till I scarcely more than muttered “Other friends have flown before—
On the morrow he will leave me, as my Hopes have flown before.”
            Then the bird said “Nevermore.”
    Startled at the stillness broken by reply so aptly spoken,
“Doubtless,” said I, “what it utters is its only stock and store
    Caught from some unhappy master whom unmerciful Disaster
    Followed fast and followed faster till his songs one burden bore—
Till the dirges of his Hope that melancholy burden bore
            Of ‘Never—nevermore’.”
    But the Raven still beguiling all my fancy into smiling,
Straight I wheeled a cushioned seat in front of bird, and bust and door;
    Then, upon the velvet sinking, I betook myself to linking
    Fancy unto fancy, thinking what this ominous bird of yore—
What this grim, ungainly, ghastly, gaunt, and ominous bird of yore
            Meant in croaking “Nevermore.”
    This I sat engaged in guessing, but no syllable expressing
To the fowl whose fiery eyes now burned into my bosom’s core;
    This and more I sat divining, with my head at ease reclining
    On the cushion’s velvet lining that the lamp-light gloated o’er,
But whose velvet-violet lining with the lamp-light gloating o’er,
            She shall press, ah, nevermore!
    Then, methought, the air grew denser, perfumed from an unseen censer
Swung by Seraphim whose foot-falls tinkled on the tufted floor.
    “Wretch,” I cried, “thy God hath lent thee—by these angels he hath sent thee
    Respite—respite and nepenthe from thy memories of Lenore;
Quaff, oh quaff this kind nepenthe and forget this lost Lenore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!—
Whether Tempter sent, or whether tempest tossed thee here ashore,
    Desolate yet all undaunted, on this desert land enchanted—
    On this home by Horror haunted—tell me truly, I implore—
Is there—is there balm in Gilead?—tell me—tell me, I implore!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Prophet!” said I, “thing of evil!—prophet still, if bird or devil!
By that Heaven that bends above us—by that God we both adore—
    Tell this soul with sorrow laden if, within the distant Aidenn,
    It shall clasp a sainted maiden whom the angels name Lenore—
Clasp a rare and radiant maiden whom the angels name Lenore.”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    “Be that word our sign of parting, bird or fiend!” I shrieked, upstarting—
“Get thee back into the tempest and the Night’s Plutonian shore!
    Leave no black plume as a token of that lie thy soul hath spoken!
    Leave my loneliness unbroken!—quit the bust above my door!
Take thy beak from out my heart, and take thy form from off my door!”
            Quoth the Raven “Nevermore.”
    And the Raven, never flitting, still is sitting, still is sitting
On the pallid bust of Pallas just above my chamber door;
    And his eyes have all the seeming of a demon’s that is dreaming,
    And the lamp-light o’er him streaming throws his shadow on the floor;
And my soul from out that shadow that lies floating on the floor
            Shall be lifted—nevermore!
Edgar Allan Poe portrait by Ferdinand Huszti Horvath.
In 1989-92, Arcane Comics & Eclipse Comics did a short series of horror anthologies that had some DEEPLY sick, disturbing material in them.  Among them, inexplicably, editor Steve Niles decided to reprint the 1930 Horvath "RAVEN".  Why, I cannot fathom... but his doing so allowed me to get my hands on it so I could scan the pages, process them, and POST them here.  So, a belated "thank you" for some of the most warped books I've ever had in my hands.

DAUGHTERS OF FLY IN MY EYE
cover by JON J. MUTH   (Arcane/Eclipse Books  /  1990) 
Copyright (C) 1930 Dodd, Mead & Company.

Scans of THE RAVEN (1930) cover from the Ebay site.
Scans of DAUGHTERS OF FLY IN MY EYE (1990 reprint) from MY collection.
Poe portrait from the Poe Museum site.

Restorations by Henry R. Kujawa.

For more:
Read about Edgar Allen Poe at Wikipedia.

Read about Ferdinand Horvath at the Jill Hill Media blog.

Read about Basil Rathbone at Wikipedia.
Read about Vincent Price at Wikipedia.
Read about Christopher Lee at Wikipedia.

Read about The Raven at Wikipedia.
Read the complete poem at the Poetry Foundation site.
See THE RAVEN Gallery of Illustrations!

     Audio / Video:
Hear the Basil Rathbone recording!
See the Vincent Price performance!
Hear the Christopher Lee recording!
Watch The Simpsons cartoon!

     Comics:
See the James William Carling RAVEN illustrations!
See the William Ladd Taylor RAVEN illustrations!
See the Gustave Dore RAVEN illustrations!
See the Galen J. Perrett RAVEN illustrations!
See the John Rea Neill RAVEN illustrations!   (coming soon!)

See the Ferdinand H. Horvath RAVEN illustrations!
Read the Harvey Kurtzman / Will Elder RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Wally Wood RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Mort Drucker RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Frank Springer RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Nico Rosso RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2 George Woodbridge RAVEN adaptations!
Read the Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Peter Cappiello RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Paul Coker, Jr. RAVEN adaptation!   (coming soon!)
Read the Steve Ditko RAVEN story!
Read the Jeff Bonivert RAVEN adaptation!
     (Coming soon:)
Read the Ricardo Leite RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Jerry Gersten RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Gahan Wilson RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 1st Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2nd Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation
     at the Canibuk blog!
Read the Thomas Eide RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2nd Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Eureka Productions RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Stuart Tipples RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Mangosta RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 3rd Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Yein Yip RAVEN adaptation!

Read the David G. Fores RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 3rd Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Edu Molina RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Duncan Long RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Terrier Studios RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Pete Katz RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Rebecca Tough RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Gareth Hinds RAVEN adaptation!

See my Edgar Allan Poe overview at this very blog!

Don't miss the BONUS GALLERY of ILLUSTRATIONS up next!

(Continued in Poe 1944, Pt. 1)

Sunday, April 29, 2018

Poe 1910, Pt. 3

(Continued from Poe 1910, Pt. 2) 

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE AND THE BELLS   (1910)

Continuing our look at an "Illustrated" book with 3 of Poe's most famous poems.

Third and finally:

"ANNABEL LEE"

John Rea Neill is probably best known for illustrating an entire series of OZ books by author Frank L. Baum.  Among his other projects was this book, whose existence I learned of only recently, and which, so far, I've only been able to find a relatively small number of images from.

Neill's art is light, flowery, intricate, and to my eyes, reminds me an awful lot of the work of modern illustrator P. Craig Russell !

Copies of this book are far beyond my budget, so I'm going to have to wait
until either a really cheap copy becomes available (as it did with the 1881
"THE BELLS"), or, for someone else to post hi-res scans of it online.

In the meantime, I'm posting what I have found...

ENJOY!

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE & THE BELLS
cover by JOHN REA NEILL
     (The Reilly & Britton Company  /  Chicago, IL  /  1910)
"ANNABEL LEE"  /  Version 1
art by JOHN REA NEILL
Page ??
Page ??
Page ??
Page 88
Page 89
Page 92
Page 93
Page ??
John Rea Neill.
Copyright (C) 1910 The Reilly & Britton Company.

Scans of THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE & THE BELLS (1910) from the Books0977 Tumblr,
     Wikipedia,  Pinterest,  Ebay,  Heaven In A Wild Flower,
      and David Mason Books sites.
Photo of John Rea neill from the Oz Wikia site.

Restorations by Henry R. Kujawa.

For more:
Read about Edgar Allen Poe at The Poe Museum site.

Read about John Rea Neill at Wikipedia.
See more John Rea Neill art at the John R. Neill.net site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Pulp Artists site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Ask Art site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Illustrator's Lounge site.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Amazon.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Ebay.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Etsy.

Read about ANNABEL LEE at Awesome Stories.
Read the poem at the Poe Stories site.
See the ANNABEL LEE Gallery of Illustrations

     Audio:
Hear the James Mason ANNABEL LEE recording!
Hear the Basil Rathbone ANNEBEL LEE recording!

     Comics:
Read the John Rea Neill ANNABEL LEE adaptation!   (coming soon!)
Read the Rolland Livingstone ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Edegar & Ignacio Justo ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
     (Coming soon:)
Read the Jose Matucenio ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Rodolfo Zalla ANNABEL LEE adaptation!

Read the Gahan Wilson ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the P. Craig Russell ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Bill D. Fountain ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Toni Pawlowsky ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Mangosta ANNABEL LEE adaptation!

Read the J.B. Bonivert ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Eva Sanchez ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Julian Peters ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the David G. Fores ANNABEL LEE adaptation!
Read the Nikos Malk ANNABEL LEE adaptation!

Read the Jer Frog ANNABEL LEE adaptation!

See my Edgar Allan Poe overview at this very blog!

Don't miss the BONUS GALLERY of ILLUSTRATIONS up next! 

(Continued in Poe 1910, Pt. 4)

Poe 1910, Pt. 2

(Continued from Poe 1910, Pt. 1) 

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE AND THE BELLS   (1910)

Continuing our look at an "Illustrated" book with 3 of Poe's most famous poems.

Second in line:

"THE BELLS"

John Rea Neill is probably best known for illustrating an entire series of OZ books by author Frank L. Baum.  Among his other projects was this book, whose existence I learned of only recently, and which, so far, I've only been able to find a relatively small number of images from.

Neill's art is light, flowery, intricate, and to my eyes, reminds me an awful lot of the work of modern illustrator P. Craig Russell !

Copies of this book are far beyond my budget, so I'm going to have to wait
until either a really cheap copy becomes available (as it did with the 1881
"THE BELLS"), or, for someone else to post hi-res scans of it online.

In the meantime, I'm posting what I have found...

ENJOY!

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE & THE BELLS
cover by JOHN REA NEILL
     (The Reilly & Britton Company  /  Chicago, IL  /  1910)
"THE BELLS"  /  Version 2
art by JOHN REA NEILL
Page 80
Page 81
Copyright (C) 1910 The Reilly & Britton Company.

Scans of THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE & THE BELLS (1910) from the Books0977 Tumblr,
     Wikipedia,  Pinterest,  Ebay,  Heaven In A Wild Flower,
      and David Mason Books sites.

Restorations by Henry R. Kujawa.

For more:
Read about Edgar Allen Poe at Wikipedia.

Read about John Rea Neill at Wikipedia.
See more John Rea Neill art at the John R. Neill.net site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Pulp Artists site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Ask Art site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Illustrator's Lounge site.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Amazon.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Ebay.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Etsy.

Read about THE BELLS at Wikipedia.
Read the poem at the Poe Stories.com site.
See THE BELLS Gallery of Illustrations.

Read about Basil Rathbone at Wikipedia.

     Audio:
Hear the Basil Rathbone recording!

     Comics:
Read the Porter & Coates THE BELLS adaptation!
Read the John Rea Neill THE BELLS adaptation!   (coming soon!)
Read the Louis Zansky THE BELLS adaptation!
     (Coming soon:)
Read the Juan Gomez THE BELLS adaptation!
Read the Bill D. Fountain THE BELLS adaptation!

See my Edgar Allan Poe overview at this very blog!

(Continued in Poe 1910, Pt. 3) 

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Poe 1910, Pt. 1

(Continued from Poe 1906) 

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE AND THE BELLS   (1910)

This time I'm taking a look at an "Illustrated" book with 3 of Poe's most famous poems.

First up:

"THE RAVEN"

John Rea Neill is probably best known for illustrating an entire series of OZ books by author Frank L. Baum.  Among his other projects was this book, whose existence I learned of only recently, and which, so far, I've only been able to find a relatively small number of images from.

Neill's art is light, flowery, intricate, and to my eyes, reminds me an awful lot of the work of modern illustrator P. Craig Russell !

Copies of this book are far beyond my budget, so I'm going to have to wait
until either a really cheap copy becomes available (as it did with the 1881
"THE BELLS"), or, for someone else to post hi-res scans of it online.

In the meantime, I'm posting what I have found...

ENJOY!

THE RAVEN, ANNABEL LEE & THE BELLS
cover by JOHN REA NEILL
     (The Reilly & Britton Company  /  Chicago, IL  /  1910)
"THE RAVEN"  /  Version 5
art by JOHN REA NEILL
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Pages 4-5

Pages 12-13
Page 24
Page 25
Page 32
Page 33
Page ??
Page ??
Page ??
Pages 48
Page 49
Pages ??-??

Copyright (C) 1910 The Reilly & Britton Company.

Scans of THE RAVEN (1910) from the Books0977 Tumblr,
     Wikipedia,  Pinterest,  Ebay,  Heaven In A Wild Flower,
      and David Mason Books sites.

Restorations by Henry R. Kujawa

For more:
Read about Edgar Allen Poe at Wikipedia.

Read about John Rea Neill at Wikipedia.
See more John Rea Neill art at the John R. Neill.net site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Pulp Artists site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Ask Art site.
See more John Rea Neill art at the Illustrator's Lounge site.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Amazon.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Ebay.
BUY John Rea Neill books from Etsy.

Read about Basil Rathbone at Wikipedia.
Read about Vincent Price at Wikipedia.
Read about Christopher Lee at Wikipedia.

Read about The Raven at Wikipedia.
Read the complete poem at the Poetry Foundation site.
See THE RAVEN Gallery of Illustrations!

     Audio / Video:
Hear the Basil Rathbone recording!
See the Vincent Price performance!
Hear the Christopher Lee recording!
Watch The Simpsons cartoon!

     Comics:
See the James William Carling RAVEN illustrations!
See the William Ladd Taylor RAVEN illustrations!
See the Gustave Dore RAVEN illustrations!
See the Galen J. Perrett RAVEN illustrations!
See the John Rea Neill RAVEN illustrations!   (coming soon!)

See the Ferdinand H. Horvath RAVEN illustrations!
Read the Harvey Kurtzman / Will Elder RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Wally Wood RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Mort Drucker RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Frank Springer RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Nico Rosso RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2 George Woodbridge RAVEN adaptations!
Read the Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Peter Cappiello RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Paul Coker, Jr. RAVEN adaptation!   (coming soon!)
Read the Steve Ditko RAVEN story!
Read the Jeff Bonivert RAVEN adaptation!
     (Coming soon:)
Read the Ricardo Leite RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Jerry Gersten RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Gahan Wilson RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 1st Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2nd Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation
     at the Canibuk blog!
Read the Thomas Eide RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 2nd Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Eureka Productions RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Stuart Tipples RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Mangosta RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 3rd Luciano Irrthum RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Yein Yip RAVEN adaptation!

Read the David G. Fores RAVEN adaptation!
Read the 3rd Richard Corben RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Edu Molina RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Duncan Long RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Terrier Studios RAVEN adaptation!

Read the Pete Katz RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Rebecca Tough RAVEN adaptation!
Read the Gareth Hinds RAVEN adaptation!

See my Edgar Allan Poe overview at this very blog!

(Continued in Poe 1910, Pt. 2)

Sunday, April 22, 2018

Poe 1886

(Continued from Poe 1884) 

LENORE   (1886)

"Illustrated" books for short stories or poems were a big thing in the 1880s.

Another one I found posted online was done for one of Poe's lesser-known poems...

"LENORE"

Starting life under the title "A PAEAN", Poe revised this poem several times until its final form, so that it is usually listed as a separate work.

The theme of the death of a beautiful woman is a common one for Poe, and also turns up in other poems including "ANNABEL LEE",  "EULALIE", "THE RAVEN",  "ULALUME", and his short stories "BERENIE",  "ELEONORA", and "MORELLA".

The scans for this were so nice, I knew I had to set up a page for it.  Together with "THE BELLS" (which I actually bought a cheap copy of), this in turn inspired me to do more research and decide to set up MORE such pages, and even look to buy a couple more books.

A very special "THANK YOU!" to "Alexander", at the Book Graphics blog, for posting these wonderful images.

Oddly enough, as of 4-28-2018, this is the ONLY illustrated version of this poem
I have found!

ENJOY!

LENORE
cover by HENRY SANDHAM   (Estes & Lauriat  /  Boston  /  1886)
"LENORE"  /  Version 1
     Art by HENRY SANDHAM,  A.R.A.
Page 1
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
Page 5
Page 6
Page 7
Page 8
Page 9
Page 10
Page 11
Page 12
Page 13
Henry Sandham.
REPRINTS:
Copyright (C) 1884 Estes & Lauriat  and  Henry Sandham.

Scans of "LENORE" (1886) from the Book Graphics blog,
     with special thanks to "Alexander".
Scans of other editions from the Ebay and Abe Books sites.
Photo of Henry Sandham from the Wikipedia site.

Restorations by Henry R. Kujawa

For more:
Read about Edgar Allen Poe at Wikipedia.

Read about Henry Sandham at Wikipedia.

Read about Lenore at Wikipedia.
Read the complete poem at The Literature Network site.
See the LENORE Gallery of Illustrations.

     Audio / Video:
See the LENORE animated cartoon.

     Comics:
Read the Henry Sandham LENORE illustrated poem.

See my Edgar Allan Poe overview at this very blog!

Don't miss the BONUS GALLERY of ILLUSTRATIONS up next! 

(Continued in Poe 1886, Pt.2)